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List of English words beginning with W that are not used in the United States

What will I learn from the book List of English words beginning with W that are not used in the United States?

There are a lot of words in the English language that are used in everyday life in the Great Britain that is not used in America or has a different meaning. This book is for teachers or people who have an high understanding of the English language already.

Who is the book of English words not used in America aimed at?

The List of English words from A to Z book is a reference book that has been written for students and the general reader. It will help you with any basic questions about spelling, punctuation, grammar and word usage that you are likely to ask. This page list all words and saying beginning with W and shows clear explanations with sentences where they are needed.

How do I use this English book of words from A to Z?

Click on each letter of the alphabet to get the full list of British words and explanation of each.

[ A ] [ B ] [ C ] [ D ] [ E ] [ F ] [ G ] [ H ] [ I ] [ J ] [ K ] [ L ] [ M ] [ N ] [ O ] [ P ] [ Q ] [ R ] [ S ] [ T ] [ U ] [ V ] [ W ] [ X ] [ Y ] [ Z ]

This is book should be used to help reference words or sayings. It is not to be used as a dictionary although, it is like a dictionary, as all the words are arranged alphabetically.

Words beginning with W

wives and girlfriends, common in headlines referring to the spouse of a footballer.
wage packet
weekly employee payment (usually in cash) (US: paycheck)
(informal) buffoon, fool; milder form of idiot.
wanker *
(offensive) literally, a masturbator (although use in this context is uncommon); more likely to be used as a general insult or term of abuse
toilet (short for Water Closet). (US: bathroom [DM], US old-fashioned washroom). See also loo.
washing up
dish washing, "the dishes": "it's your turn to do the washing up"; hence washing up liquid: dish washing detergent (US: dish soap, dishwashing liquid)
an idiot. popularised by the 1981 song "Capstick Comes Home" by Tony Capstick
Extremely, very. "He's well rich" (US: "He's very rich")
Wellington boots, wellies
waterproof rubber boots, named after the Duke of Wellington.
(informal) effort (e.g.: "Give it some welly" to mean "put a bit of effort into an attempt to do something" US: elbow grease (also UK), oomph); also the singular of "wellies", for Wellington boots (US: gumboots, rubber boots)
(slang) condom; stems from "Wellington boots" which are also known as "rubbers".
What ho!
(interj.) Hello! (warmly)
whilst *
while (US and UK); 'whilst' is in common use in Yorkshire (UK) where 'while' is used colloquially to mean 'until'; (archaic in US)
(informal) complain, whine, especially repeated complaining about minor things (e.g. "Stop whingeing" meaning "stop complaining"); a different word from whine, originated in Scottish and Northern English in the 12th century. Hence whinger (derogatory), someone who complains a lot.
white coffee
coffee with milk or cream.
(informal) to continue to talk trivially about a subject long after the audience's interest has gone (assuming there was any interest in the first place). "He wittered on." wide boy
see spiv, above
windscreen The window on the front of a vehicle(US: windshield)
wing mirrors
the external mirrors on a vehicle – though no longer normally attached to the 'wings' (US: fenders) but to the doors (US: sideview mirrors, side mirrors)
(slang) childish term for a penis (US: winkie) wobbler, wobbly (to have or to throw) (informal) tantrum
(slang) when cost of repair of a damaged asset (usually a car) is not feasible or exceeds its insurance value (US:total loss, totalled) Is also used formally in the context of accounting.
(offensive, term of abuse) member of an ethnic minority. The word can refer to a wide variety of non-Europeans, including Arabs, sub-Saharans (and those of sub-Saharan descent), Iranians, and Turks.